Repairing the broken tip on a kitchen knife. this is achieved by removing material mostly from the spine (top -edge) of the blade in order to preserve the thinner material on the cutting edge.

Before and after. The knife on the left is badly chipped on the cutting edge. On the right, it has been repaired.

The knife on the left has what we call a reverse bow; It is a little hard to see and in many cases it is much more drastic. if you look at the section of the blade just to the front of the thick vertical bolster, you will notice that the cutting edge is a little higher than the bottom edge of the bolster and cannot cut as it will not make contact with the cutting surface. In the image on the right, the knife has been repaired by carefully removing some of the material on the bolster and re-profiling the geometry of the cutting edge.

A before and after shot of a serrated bread knife. In the left image the serrations are almost completely gone due to extensive use. In the image to the right the serrations have been re-cut by hand on our diamond wheel. The knife is now as good as, if not better than new.

Repairing the broken tip on a very small pocket knife

Repairing the broken tip on a kitchen knife. this is achieved by removing material mostly from the spine (top -edge) of the blade in order to preserve the thinner material on the cutting edge

In the process of removing material from the bolster to repair a reverse bow. The material is removed and the cutting edge profiled simultaneously so that the blade has a smooth gradual curve from the heel of the blade to the tip.

On occasion, commercial clients will ask me to repair spatulas, scrapers or other kitchen tools. At Labrado Forge we repair many types of tools and other "useful things"

A close up of newly cut serrations

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